Posts Tagged ‘Street Fighting’

Too many times I hear and read, when showing a self-defense technique, “You shouldn’t have let the attacker get that close,” or “you should have gone on the offense.” Here’s the thing: self-defense techniques are about dealing with a situation gone bad already. If you could preemptively end the situation or avoid, then awesome, do that. But when you are caught off guard and placed into a negative situation is when you need the techniques the most.

Having said that, I at least wanted to put out a video showing a jiu-jitsu option for going on the offense when you can. In this video the fight has ensued and you are squared up with the opponent. Here’s what happens:

1. You manage the distance until you decide to engage.

2. You close the distance with a jab to cross or overhand right, which if it lands, great, but at least opens the opponent’s hands to get you into position for a single leg takedown.

3. If the opponent is unaffected by the strikes to the extent he stops your single leg setup, you can transition to a dirty boxing clinch. The dirty boxing clinch allows for strikes and throwing potential as demonstrated in the video.

I’ll let the video show the rest. Please like, share and comment on the YouTube video! Thank you all!

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Whenever I teach something in classes or lessons I always try to make clear what the context is. Is this a self defense move? Is this more MMA? Is this sport?

I overheard a conversation about a particular sweep (I believe this person was referring to a single leg x-guard sweep but he didn’t know), and the complaint the person had was about the validity or applicability of it on the street. Um, there’s not much if any. But that’s not really the point.

As martial artists are we only to ever practice lethal, 100% street ready moves? Does any art truly do that? I know lots of arts like to criticize other arts for various reasons. How about these:

“Yeah, but bjj doesn’t work against multiple opponents!”

“Oh yeah, let’s see how well boxing does you on the ground!”

“Tae Kwon Do sucks!”

Some common examples. Can’t we all just get along. Belittling styles and systems doesn’t make yours better. And it’s none of your business what others think of your style. And there’s no superior art for every situation.

But I digress and return to my original point: is the boxer who practices hitting the speed bag criticized because that’s not how he will really punch someone? Do you criticize the Kali practitioner for drilling fluid repetitive hand exchanges because he won’t do that against a real opponent? Do you think that wing chun guy really believes someone will hold as still as that wooden dummy? It’s about drills, skills, and exercise.

I always say I like jiu-jitsu because you can pew circle it as real as it gets. You can’t train any other art as love or as full contact as jiu-jitsu. But having said that, I don’t break arms and pass folks out every practice. I wouldn’t be nearly as popular. I don’t know anyone who trains like that and if you do then tell me so I can stay the hell away from them!

And don’t tell anyone, but I love the sport stuff! I just posted a No Gi Berimbolo video the other day, and it’s not because I think people need to see it in order to defend against a mugger. But that move is awesome and has a very important function and place. I don’t think it represents jiu-jitsu as a whole, but it’s cool and worth doing on its own.

Let me make this simpler maybe. Is every single ounce of food you put in your body 100% nutritious and necessary? Do you even know what is best and most healthy for you? Even if you did, and you wanted to do only what was most right, do you think you could? Don’t lie. Variety is the spice of life and the key to longevity in your training is finding aspects of training to love.

On the flip side, I don’t recommend anyone ever divorce himself or herself from the foundational elements of the art. Whatever the art. Helio Gracie had a rubric of what made a true Gracie Jiu-Jitsu technique:

1. Street Applicability
2. Energy Efficiency
3. Naturalness of Movement

A Gracie technique had to fit these above all else. Having said that, even Helio didn’t train only techniques and positions that would keep him punch proof. He contextualized the moment and used the best tool for the job, because that is at the heart of his art as much as any other principle. But he and his lineage, one of which I am proud to be a member within, must needs keep the street/sport concept close to the chest. If you don’t understand that spider guard will not in and of itself help you in a street fight then you need to build your self defense knowledge bank and foundation a lot stronger…and don’t go getting into any bar brawls in the meantime, ok?

However, if you can react appropriately when swung on in the street; if you can get surprised and find equanimity enough to defend intelligently; and for the love of god, if you can get out of a headlock, then you have reached a level of competency in your training. Now kick it up a notch and learn how to deconstruct those moves, maybe compete in a tournament to test yourself out, or maybe begin experimenting with some trends. No harm done in that type of training. But keep the foundation alive always!

I guess what I want to say is let others live and work and play how they will. Don’t look down your nose at a karate tournament point fighter and say that won’t work in a street fight – he should know and probably deep down does. Don’t watch guys pulling guard in the Pan Ams and call them cowards – their are playing to the points of the game and increasing their chances of winning by playing to their strengths along the way. Maybe each of these people train different things and understand the difference between street and sport. Maybe they don’t. It’s not your concern either way.

I write this for you. I write this for me. I’m guilty of judging and belittling. I’m trying to do better. Thanks for reading my words.