Archive for the ‘Technique Specific Topics’ Category

Too many times I hear and read, when showing a self-defense technique, “You shouldn’t have let the attacker get that close,” or “you should have gone on the offense.” Here’s the thing: self-defense techniques are about dealing with a situation gone bad already. If you could preemptively end the situation or avoid, then awesome, do that. But when you are caught off guard and placed into a negative situation is when you need the techniques the most.

Having said that, I at least wanted to put out a video showing a jiu-jitsu option for going on the offense when you can. In this video the fight has ensued and you are squared up with the opponent. Here’s what happens:

1. You manage the distance until you decide to engage.

2. You close the distance with a jab to cross or overhand right, which if it lands, great, but at least opens the opponent’s hands to get you into position for a single leg takedown.

3. If the opponent is unaffected by the strikes to the extent he stops your single leg setup, you can transition to a dirty boxing clinch. The dirty boxing clinch allows for strikes and throwing potential as demonstrated in the video.

I’ll let the video show the rest. Please like, share and comment on the YouTube video! Thank you all!

If you got into a fight tomorrow, what do you think would happen? What do you think the most likely attack would be? How would you defend against it?

Below is a video I shot with Funker Tactical for their new Martial Arts YouTube channel on how to defend against a sucker punch. Far and away, the most common attack on the street is someone trying to punch someone else in the face. Arguably, this is more difficult depending on the degree of indication someone gives you prior to the attack. A “sucker punch” is one that comes from someone who hasn’t given typical indication that his intention is to fight. It is exceedingly difficult to defend against something about which you have little to no forewarning.

In training martial arts, you will see a variety of techniques on how to deal with such an attack. The video illustrates my favorite, from Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, using a non-threatening posture preceding the attack, moving into a clinch range to nullify his punches, then throwing him to the ground. I could have used more strikes during this, but when it comes to strikes I like to be selective, energy-efficient and not create unnecessary space. Also, after securing the clinch, a variety of takedowns could be used, depending on the posture of the attacker.

Why Grapple?

Grappling benefits the smaller, weaker person vs the larger and stronger attacker. The larger person can hit harder and reach farther. Preemptive striking as an alternative, would require the defender to be faster than the attacker. It is a mistake to ever assume you will be faster or stronger than the person attacking you…why would someone attack someone physically superior to them? Also, this situation, as I describe in the beginning, may not actually result in a fight. Just because someone is being aggressive and confrontational does not necessarily mean a physical fight has to follow. If you had a possibility to diffuse or avoid a fight, and you instead chose not to do so, then you have failed.

This Isn’t My Idea

I didn’t invent this technique. Let me make that clear. I was taught this technique by Royce Gracie, and I assume he was taught by another family member in turn. I think everyone has his own take or way of performing a technique once he learns it, based either on preference or ability. I mention this to pay respect to my teacher and to not misrepresent any concepts that are not totally my own. Having said that, there are millions of techniques out there, some better than others for certain people, and constant revisions and improvements. This technique isn’t perfect, but there is no such thing as a perfect technique. Martial Arts is a game of percentages focused on what can keep you safest in a fight. Training is the thing. So go do it.

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Some useful techniques to formulate a linear strategy for butterfly guard. Different options for the most common energies an opponent might give from this position. Butterfly Guard Sweeps and Options

Check out this technique that has gotten me out of many a difficult knee-on-belly situation. I hope you like it.

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Firstly, this isn’t a religious post, except in the fact that jiu-jitsu is a deeply religious thing for me. Rather, I’m referring to having faith in the training, in the technique, in the realization that all will come when you are ready for it.

The first truly Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu technique I ever learned was a half guard pass. I had virtually no context for it. It had never come up in a fight and I hadn’t realized what it was if it occurred in training prior to learning it. I repped it out and listened to the explanation for it but it wouldn’t be accessible to me for some time.

Finally, probably 2 or more years later I found the exact right scenario and that technique, which I thought I had forgotten by then, came to the surface. I was ready for it! Has this ever happened to you?

This is one of those beautiful jiu-jitsu epiphony, metaphorical moments of clarity, when it all makes sense again. When the roll speaks to you, you understand it to be the truth because it proves its inherent value in the moment perfectly. There are of course other moments in life when the pieces fall into place, but jiu-jitsu is so often times complex and chaotic yet formulaic and precise, that it seems to hold an equation up to the universe and say “See! This is how it works!”

Sorry for the philosophical rant, but that’s the nature of the thing. If you dismiss a move as not useful, either in itself or just for you, you miss out on the possibility that maybe you were simply not ready for it. It happens the other route as well. For example, the white belt who has “mastered” the upa escape and now only relies on the elbow escape because the upa is “too basic.” Or then there is the intermediate student who “needs another sweep” because everyone has caught on to his standard sweeps. It is simply a matter of readiness and appropriateness. So then the statement above could equally say, “If it isn’t happening for you, the situation isn’t appropriate for it.” Same meaning.

The answer, to me, is a matter of having faith that if the technique is trained enough, it will work for you when you are ready. Or that you will reach a moment when the situation is apporpriate and you were able to apply it to the situation. The only missing ingredients then, are a lens for determining if the technique is sound in itself (which comes with time), and the patience to stick it out and develop proficiency and ability with the technique (which takes faith.

Now go train!

If you haven’t checked out BJJHQ.com you’re missing out on one of the coolest bjj merchandise websites out there. I made a video wearing the 93Brand Anvil rash guard they sent me and I love it. Check it out:

The Anvil Rash Guard from 93Brand is pretty awesome. Fits with all the right contour and not a loose thread anywhere on this thing – even after I rolled in it for over 2 hours it felt like I just put it on. The design is fresh and it’s up there with my favorites now.

Everyone knows I am a diehard DaFirma Kimono company fan, and that hasn’t changed. But I really like BJJHQ.COM and their new take on the merchandise overload going on with too many of these warehouses online. They have 1 deal per day…that’s right, just one. But it’s always awesome and always a crazy good deal!

So check out my video technique showing an easy way to translate the typically gi-dependent berimbolo into your no gi game. Then get back on the mat and rep it out!

Very.

That’s my opinion, that solo drilling for bjj is crucial for building fluidity, continuity if movement and creative visualization. I have always put a lot of thought into my solo drills, partly because I, like so many, didn’t always have constant partner access. So I would find core segments and movements within techniques, oftentimes the most difficult moves, and dissect these alone.

I remember Ido Portal saying, to paraphrase, “if you can’t move your own body, what business do you have lifting weights?” This phrase resonated with me, because I encounter so many people that try to impose their will while rolling yet they themselves lack the prerequisite coordination it takes to maintain their own balance during simple movements. Learn about your own body first and how to move it efficiently and this will let you know what you can make happen against an opponent.

Solo drilling works the precision of technical movement even better at times than partner work, because you have no partner to overly depend on. Therefore, you will see all your limitations and inadequacies under the microscope when you solo drill, making it impossible to cheat the movement.

You should be able to tell by this point that I consider solo drilling not simply rote repetition for the sake of exercise, but deliberate, careful, thoughtful movement with purpose. And whether it is standing, shooting or sprawling, turns, rolls, sweep movements, bridging, or some obscure contortion you find yourself constantly encountering, it is all good.

A good friend told me, “your body will do most anything you ask it to…if you ask it nicely.” So get on the mat, visualize the situation, and move continuously, constantly and consciously. Your body, your mind and your jiu-jitsu will thank you for it.

Here are some helpful drills I like for top game and bottom game using a grappling dummy: