Archive for August 1, 2017

Is Fighting Naked More Realistic? — Eli’s BJJ Blog

Posted: August 1, 2017 in Uncategorized

I found it strange when “No-Gi” became a thing. Not the concept of training without the kimono, which I do at least half of my training time, but the label. I see the necessity, the value and the realism of it. But the moniker, and the way it stuck and the eventual dogma that has […]

via Is Fighting Naked More Realistic? — Eli’s BJJ Blog

Image result for greek fight

I found it strange when “No-Gi” became a thing. Not the concept of training without the kimono, which I do at least half of my training time, but the label. I see the necessity, the value and the realism of it. But the moniker, and the way it stuck and the eventual dogma that has become associated with the concept of No-Gi training is just, well…weird.

Here is why I think it is weird to be dogmatic about no-gi training, and by dogmatic I mean the viewpoint of those convinced that training with a gi is somehow less realistic for self-defense purposes. Do these people plan to only fight naked? Because I YouTubed it and I found very few completely naked fights (although there are some bizarre things turned up by a Google search for “Naked Fighting” and I don’t recommend this search).

All joking aside, I understand how this came about of course. The more grip dependent bjj became in sportive and sparring contexts, the more divorced from real fighting it became. I agree that spider guard has extremely limited application to a street fight. But this is the extreme example, and too many folks confuse the part for the whole in regards to usefulness in martial arts training in general. For example, if you think that the patty-cake drills frequently found in Wing Chun, JKD, FMA styles, etc. are direct reflections of how the fight would or should happen, then you understand nothing about violence. Moreover, you missed the point of those drills. Drills like those are like chain wrestling or kata: they are segments of techniques connected with likely transitions, not necessarily linked for practicality but for flow and fluidity to enhance sensitivity, receptiveness to changes in energy, angle recognition and building of attributes useful in an actual fight.

Back to BJJ and No-Gi grappling, I find it especially strange that I don’t hear criticism of wrestling or boxing as “unrealistic” methods of training for fighting. Rarely do I see a comment on a boxing video the way I see on BJJ competition videos such as “This shit will get you killed if you try it in a street fight.” Yet, I don’t think it is even arguable that a bjj competition is more of a “fight” than boxing by far.

And now that I said that and surely pissed off some BJJ haters, let me elaborate: Boxing is extremely useful and valuable for a street fight, in my opinion. My opinion, however, is that the rules of boxing are far more strict than boxing.

Here is a comparison:

What can you NOT do in BJJ competition that you CAN do in boxing? Strike. That’s about it.
Now what can you NOT do in boxing that you CAN do in BJJ competition? Clinch for extended periods of time, throw, sweep, grapple, choke, attack joints for submissions and the list goes on.

Please understand, this is not saying that one is superior to another. This is just to point out the absurdity of comments like the example given above that are ubiquitous on BJJ videos.

Back to my original point, I suggest that training in the gi, with accessibility of grips, is potentially more realistic for self-defense. Understanding how to grab, hold and control someone is very important when not in effective striking ranges, and whether you want or not, most likely the fight will hit a range where striking is not the most effective tool for the job. And while the clothing an attacker has on may not identically match a gi, there will be comparable grip opportunities, that with intelligent training can be modified to fit the occasion. Training with complete restriction against grabbing the clothing can limit this ability.

If you are training for a No-Gi competition or MMA, then of course, don’t become too dependent on gi training. Although, it is arguable that there is still some benefit to training with the gi for some portion of a fight camp for MMA. But that is a subject for another time.

So in summary, unless you are training for No-Gi comp or MMA or specifically for battling nudists, there is a benefit to be had from training with the gi, especially as it pertains to self-defense. And even at the sport level, there are attributes to be gained or polished by wearing the gi. Sport is sport, whether wrestling, boxing, fencing, whatever and one should develop a filter for absorbing what is useful and discarding what is not for varying contexts of fighting.