You Can’t Have MMA Without Jiu-Jitsu

Posted: October 26, 2013 in 1, All Eli's BJJ Posts, Most Recent Posts
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Remember when MMA was called NHB? Vale Tudo? Fighting?

MMA is its own sport now complete with rules, restrictions, minutiae that makes sure the matches are more even and close and entertaining. Gone are the days of style versus style. And that is how it all started. Now, I don’t mean to say that I don’t enjoy watching and following MMA. I think it serves a valuable purpose and has done much to advance the study of martial arts in general. It’s just different now.

I’m a firm believer that in a one on one fight, Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a superior method. I feel that it is also one of or the most valuable arts in self-defense, weapons attacks, multiple attacker situations, and more. But there is less of an arena to test out and prove the efficacy of Jiu-Jitsu against other arts in those situations. But with person versus person, one on one, we now have a venue and it is called mixed martial arts.

What MMA has done most proficiently in its history is twofold. Firstly, it has shown that you absolutely must know the ground aspect of fighting. If you don’t and your opponent does, you will lose 95% of the time. Secondly, in my estimation of things, it has shown the value of knowing multiple arts for various ranges of combat. I only say that this is second because many martial arts have evolved in their particular areas based on the forefathers’ predilection and proficiency at those areas.

Likewise, much of martial arts history has been spread through charisma just as much as performance. The ability of an impressive instructor to convince the masses that he can transfer his abilities (historically based on athleticism) to anyone. Inflating of egos, misdirection of importance of techniques, and watered down instruction became tools of the trade in the martial arts industry. This allowed many arts to thrive because they were easily taught and the practitioners felt impressed.

Then 1993 (much earlier outside the US) changed so much. A skinny Brazilian choked and locked his way to becoming the face of what martial arts was sorely missing. The alarm sounded that the necessity of knowing how to grapple, particularly on the ground, was crucial to surviving a fight efficiently. You could always be big and strong and fast and beat people up, but the maxim of technique over strength finally and truthfully resounded in the form of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.

Then we stood on the precipice of a new generation forming. We, the experienced martial artists, thought of as experts in our fields, had to look in the mirror and to choose a path. At that moment, you could either move dramatically forward and pretend that you were the exception and you could create other exceptions to the Jiu-Jitsu zeitgeist. Or you could swallow some pride and incorporate this amazing art into your repertoire.

I was one that swallowed my pride, already a black belt in traditional jujitsu, I chose to don a white belt and study the Gracie way. 16 years later I would receive my black belt under Royce Gracie. In that time I’ve found my true niche and developed an understanding of martial arts and fighting. Moreover I’ve found out about myself and life in general, with Jiu-Jitsu being the vehicle of my education.

Of the various routes I take to proselytize about Jiu-Jitsu, speaking of the importance of it in MMA is included. People are losing sight of how necessary understanding about Jiu-Jitsu is in MMA because they see people trying for the knockout and to make the fights more flamboyant in order to get themselves noticed and make big bonuses. Fans or prospective fighters interested in learning more are losing the awareness that, even though there are more standup battles, Jiu-Jitsu is just as important, or even more so, than ever.

So rules, no rules; sport or street; fighting is fighting and Jiu-Jitsu is about the techniques underlying the fight. It is as scientific an approach to something as chaotic as fighting gets and should be appreciated by anyone interested in understanding about fighting, combat, self-defense and physical competition.

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Comments
  1. […] Elbow: Steve Carl Puts Josh Burkman To Sleep With A Triangle Rodrigo Pagani: Gangster Techniques Eli Knight: You Can’t Have MMA Without Jiu-Jitsu The National: Jiu-Jitsu Has Gripped Attention Of The UAE Chewjitsu: I Love Teaching Kids BJJ […]

  2. Jake says:

    100% agree that Jiu-Jistu is essential to MMA. Ever since UFC 1 where Royce Gracie shocked much of the world (but not serious fighting fans), Jiu-Jitsu’s importance to MMA has been undeniable.

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