3 Types of Jiu-Jitsu Fights

Posted: September 25, 2013 in Uncategorized
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Jiu-Jitsu in Fighting

Jiu-Jitsu has been proven to be one of the most, if not the most, effective martial arts in the world. What that means exactly varies depending on the source you’re consulting. Is it about self-defense? Is it about fighting? Is it only a portion or range of a fight or is it comprehensive and complete? To make it easier, first consider that there are essentially three types of fight situations:

1. Non-consensual attacks

2. Consensual street fights

3. Consensual sport fights

The first of these is typically what we think of when we think self-defense in the martial arts community. For example, if someone suddenly grabs you, sneaks up behind you or sucker punches you. These attacks have little or no prior indication that they will take place, and the victim typically wants to escape this situation as quickly as possible.

Second of these types, consensual street fights, are your typically agreed-upon bar fights, playground scuffles, or night at the club gone wrong. There are many similarities in this situation and the first category in regard to the lack of restrictions placed on the participants. The main difference here is that to some degree (typically more on one side than the other) the combatants have entered into the situation of their own volition. One or both persons in this type of fight could have avoided the situation easier than in a blind-sided attack, which is why I refer to this as a consensual street fight.

Thirdly, there exists the sportive element of fighting, which while it serves its place in the evolution and refinement of certain elements of martial arts, is a consensual combat relegated by agreed upon rules. Such rules as weight classes, time limits, point systems and prohibited techniques make this style of combat less realistic than unregulated combat, but it is fighting nonetheless and as such jiu-jitsu is applicable to it.

In each condition, jiu-jitsu has been proven effective through years of trial and implementation, repeatedly producing favorable results. As scientifically proven as possible with conditions as chaotic as a fight, jiu-jitsu has come out on top as a means of self-defense, complete and efficient across the most categories of fight situations. While the adage “there is no art superior all the time, but there is at a particular time,” may still hold true at its core, jiu-jitsu rivals any art in terms of applicability to the basic three common conditions of violence I am referring to in this post.

It can be argued that in MMA, one needs to know other elements of fighting in order to compete on the elite level today, but this wasn’t the case in 1993. Certain other styles are very effective in street fights as well, but typically require the defendant to be physically athletic enough to execute energetic movements. For me, ultimately what makes a martial art is its efficiency, practicality, versatility, and universal applicability. Based on these criteria, jiu-jitsu is king, offering the ability for everyone to defend themselves, improve their bodily awareness and athleticism, cultivate creativity and problem solving ability, and provide psychological and emotional well-being through equanimity.

 

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Comments
  1. Personally, I am very careful not to train in different martial arts, ie MMA. I chose to train in BJJ. The reason, I do not want to become a Jack of All Trades and an Ace of nothing. With life and all its demands, I only have a limited finite amount of time to train. I like training in BJJ and I feel that it provides all I need to defend myself. I feel, that if 1 night I trained BJJ and then another night I trained in Muay Thai, and all I could train was 2 times a week, then it would take me much longer to get good at either as compared to just training BJJ 2 x a week.

  2. thekillerj says:

    Nice post. It’s reassuring to know I didn’t waste a good chunk of my adult years learning an ineffective art. Proof is in the pudding.

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