I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the concept of “Never Leave The Mat.” I say concept because even though my mind has been on this, the phrase didn’t come to fruition until I saw this video recently (come back and read after watching or watch it after reading)

And then it clicked. This is what I’ve been trying to put into words. I’ve touched on it and caught many multifaceted glimpses into the nature of this statement, but that phrase sums it up nicely. Just as Mr. Jepsen embodies this ideal of “never leaving the playground” so have I been proselytizing the notion of never leaving the mat, just without the expression of it in so many words. Simply put, wherever it is that you go to find yourself, never leave that place…at least not principally. Couple this idea with that of self-exploration within your immediate sphere of influence.

This is maybe the inverse of that idea of “Leave It All On The Mat” which is a concept I’m sure you’re familiar with if you have been training jiu-jitsu for any length of time. Typically that idea refers to the notion of putting everything you’ve got into the effort you expend during training, exhausting yourself as if your jiu-jitsu game grows like a fatigued muscle after a hard weightlifting session. Rather, the idea of “Never Leave The Mat” refers to taking the benefit and revelation and the epiphanous moments you experience in that sacred space, performing that sacred activity, with you along the journeys of everyday life.

This is also different than just saying “find your happy place.” My happiest place is with my daughter. However, I have a certain particular role or set of roles that I have to play when I’m with my daughter that may or may not be the best for the rest of my life. But jiu-jitsu to me brings about a clarity and focus and pervasive calmness that translates into other areas of my life including the type of father that I am. My daughter should benefit from my training jiu-jitsu because training makes me patient, compassionate, energized and happy.

I see so many people who train various styles (and depending on where I could even include jiu-jitsu when trained poorly) who walk around with hostility and anger, because they only want to fight or win. Why train if you’re not better for doing so? Or if you’re only finding that sensation of clarity and purpose and beauty when you are on the mat and you’re not able to recreate that off the mat then keep at it. Remember it. Recollect it. Train until you can reach that satori moment, and then train until you can’t forget it.

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